'Ramesh Srinivasan'
November 16, 2017

Technology and Cultural Agency: Moving Past the Myth of Western Singularity

ARNIC will have guest speaker ‘Ramesh Srinivasan’ on November 16th 2017. He has been a faculty member at UCLA since 2005 in the Information Studies and Design|Media Arts departments. He is the founder of the UC-wide Digital Cultures Lab, exploring the meaning of technology worldwide as it spreads to the far reaches of our world. He is also the author of the books: “Whose Global Village? Rethinking How Technology Impacts Our World” with NYU Press,… Read More » “Technology and Cultural Agency: Moving Past the Myth of Western Singularity”

EllenHelsper2015238x280
October 12, 2017

Visiting lecturer talk: Ellen Helsper on urban, digital inequality

Visiting scholar Ellen Helsper will be giving a talk October 12th, 2017, in ASC 225. 
Talk description: Digital inequalities theories focus on structural and individual factors to explain the links between social and digital inequalities. Research suggests the existence of vicious cycles where those who are better off in a traditional sense are able to take up the opportunities that ICTs offer to a greater extent than those with fewer resources. However,… Read More » “Visiting lecturer talk: Ellen Helsper on urban, digital inequality”

September 14, 2017

Lecture by Hernan Galperin: Discrimination in the platform economy

Talk Description: Our economic transactions are increasingly mediated by platforms such as Amazon, Uber, Kickstarter, eBay and many others. These platforms claim to operate as neutral intermediaries between private parties. However, platform design choices can greatly affect outcomes. In a series of related studies, Prof. Hernan Galperin shows how discrimination operates in Freelancer.com, one of the largest online job marketplaces. The findings reveal that information uncertainty disproportionately penalizes workers from developing countries. Further, they suggest that gender stereotypes result in less favorable hiring outcomes for women…. Read More » “Lecture by Hernan Galperin: Discrimination in the platform economy”

September 28, 2017

Guest lecture on the Tumultuous Liberation of Wireless Technology

Thomas Hazlett, Endowed Professor of Economics in the John E. Walker Department of Economics at Clemson University and director of the Information Economy Project, will be giving an ARNIC guest lecture on September 28th. He talk about his book “The Political Spectrum: The Tumultuous Liberation of Wireless Technology, from Herbert Hoover to the Smartphone” followed by Q&A. Lunch will be provided.
Description of the book:
Popular legend has it that before the Federal Radio Commission was established in 1927,… Read More » “Guest lecture on the Tumultuous Liberation of Wireless Technology”

May 24, 2017 - May 29, 2017

ARNIC Presentations at ICA 2017

Many ARNIC doctoral students and faculty members will be sharing their work at the annual International Communication Association Conference this year, held  in San Diego, California.  Please see below for a list of preconferences, presentations, and sessions at which they will be in attendance:
 
Wednesday, May 24 (Preconferences)
Hernan Galperin, PhD. Plenary session on “The Future Research Agenda of the Digital Divide”. Partnership for Progress on the Digital Divide. Location: Best Western Plus Island Palms Hotel &… Read More » “ARNIC Presentations at ICA 2017”

j_donner
March 21, 2017

Happening Now: Encoding Participation in Global and Mobile Information Economies

Jonathan Donner, Senior Director of Research at Caribou Digital, will join USC ARNIC to give a guest lecture, entitled “Happening Now: Encoding Participation in Global and Mobile Information Economies,” followed by Q&A. Lunch will be provided.
His presentation will draw on several current projects, in Digital Financial Services, in Digital Identity, and in New Internet Access models, to outline new tensions confronting the information and communications for development (ICT4D) research community as mobile technologies have become nearly ubiquitous…. Read More » “Happening Now: Encoding Participation in Global and Mobile Information Economies”

Sarah Roberts
March 7, 2017

Commercial Content Moderation: Human Workers in the Platform World

Sarah T. Roberts, Assistant Professor in the Department of Information Studies at UCLA, will join ARNIC to give a guest lecture, entitled, “Commercial Content Moderation: Human Workers in the Platform World.”
The presentation will address issues in digital labor and knowledge work within a post-Industrial, globalized context, and be followed by Q&A. Lunch will be provided…. Read More » “Commercial Content Moderation: Human Workers in the Platform World”

david_kaye
rodrigo
February 2, 2017

The Multistakeholder Model in the Management of Internet Unique Identifiers

Rodrigo de la Parra, ICANN Regional Vice President (of Latin America and the Caribbean), will join us on Thursday, February 2nd.  He will discuss “The Multistakeholder Model in the Management of Internet Unique Identifiers,” followed by Q&A.  Lunch will be provided.
Suggested readings for the discussion can be found here.
 
About Rodrigo de la Parra: 
A leading voice and advocate for the multistakeholder Internet governance model in Latin America and the Caribbean,… Read More » “The Multistakeholder Model in the Management of Internet Unique Identifiers”

eleanor-profile-picture
January 24, 2017

Silicon Utopias: Preliminary findings from a year-long ethnography in the Silicon Savannah

Eleanor Marchant, Visiting Scholar at USC ARNIC this semester and a PhD Candidate at the Annenberg School for Communications at the University of Pennsylvania, will present work from her dissertation, a yearlong ethnography of the nascent technology startup community in Nairobi Kenya, widely lauded by international news as the “tech hub of Africa” and by Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg as the “world leader in mobile money”. Eleanor spent all of 2016 embedded in the communications and research departments of an organization called iHub,… Read More » “Silicon Utopias: Preliminary findings from a year-long ethnography in the Silicon Savannah”